Four in 10 adults have cut back on grocery shopping due to rising prices

Four in 10 adults have cut back on grocery shopping due to rising prices, new figures show nine in 10 say cost of living rose last month

  • 41% of respondents said they had reduced their food spending in the past few weeks
  • This is an increase from 39% in the previous survey, conducted earlier in April
  • Meanwhile, some 88% reported an increase in their cost of living in the past month

Four in 10 adults have cut back on food purchases due to rising prices, new figures show, while nine in 10 say their cost of living has risen in the past month.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said its latest survey, between April 27 and May 8, found that 41% of adults said they had cut back on grocery spending – an increase from 39% of the previous survey, conducted earlier in April. .

Around 88 per cent of adults reported an increase in their cost of living over the past month, the ONS said.

However, this represents a slight drop after 91% of people highlighted increases in the previous survey.

The survey found that the rise in the cost of living was mainly due to more expensive food, with 92% of people reporting an increase in the price of their food purchases.

Four in 10 adults have cut back on food purchases due to rising prices, new figures show, while nine in 10 say their cost of living has risen in the past month

Last month’s ONS data showed food inflation soared 5.9% in March.

This figure is expected to climb even higher when the statistics body releases the latest UK inflation figures next week.

Around 85% of Britons surveyed also pointed to rising gas and electricity bills, with 79% saying fuel was more expensive over the period.

Almost six in 10 – 58% – said they were most concerned about the high cost of gas and electricity bills.

It comes after a leading think tank warned this week that around 1.5million UK households will struggle to pay their food and energy bills amid a worsening cost of living crisis which will plunge the UK into a recession.

The National Institute for Economic and Social Research (Niesr) blames soaring inflation and the war in Ukraine which will see many families hit with food and energy bills higher than their income.

It says the spring declaration did not increase benefits in line with inflation which has seen supermarkets raise prices, train tickets, petrol and diesel soar and taxes rise.

The think tank also says incomes will fall and thinks more than 250,000 households will ‘fall into poverty’ next year, with the total number of people living in extreme poverty reaching around one million unless measures are taken. urgent matters are taken.

While around 500,000 additional households have to choose between eating and heating.

It comes after the Bank of England predicted that consumer price index (CPI) inflation would rise from the current 7% to over 10% in October – its highest level in 40 years – due of soaring energy prices.

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